Adaptive Big Book Study

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Adaptive Big Book Study

Postby Hullabaloo » Sat Jul 07, 2007 3:55 pm

Hey Guys,
My home group is starting a Big Book Study, in addition to our Step Study. One of our members used to attend an "Adaptive" study whereby someone would choose a topic, each person would find different passages from the Big Book pertaining to this topic, then read and reflect on it.
Does anyone have experience with this type meeting? Perhaps access to a syllabus that might be helpful?
Any and all information and comments welcome.
Thanks for letting me share,
Deck
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Postby Rupe » Sat Jul 21, 2007 4:32 am

Sounds a little like an 'As Bill Sees it' Meeting we have. It's a good book for picking topics or themes as there's an index; you can pick two or three readings out on a topic. Then when people share they tend to stick on the topic instead of sharing long drunkalogs.

We actually had a little disagreement over the meeting in the end because some people thought we needed a step meeting in the area so a compromise was reached. The secretary went thru as bill sees it and cross referenced it against the big book and 12x12 so now we'll read three readings that pertain to a particular step. It works really well and we've had some powerful meetings from it.

my two cents anyway :D
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In Response: There are books out there...

Postby rare » Sat Jul 21, 2007 5:53 am

Hi Deck, :idea: There are some papers out there, and at least a couple of books. I'll see what I have around here, but I can tell you that "The ANONYMOUS PRESS" puts out two books, one that I persanally use often, and a "Study Edition" that I saw once. The study edition is probably the best resource I've ever seen. I personally use "The MINI EDITION", which has a nice index and a copy of the original manuscript. They also have a workbook and an "ELECTRONIC EDITION", a pc edition that can be downloaded. I cannot say how to get in touch w/them here (I don't know the rules, yet), but you may email me. "ANONYMOUS PRESS" is a group of AA's carrying the message, but they are not affiliated w/Alcoholics Anonymous World Services or the GSO. I hope this helps. Sounds to me like there are some good meetings there.... Rare (Rick)
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Postby Hullabaloo » Mon Jul 23, 2007 10:07 am

Thanks Rupe and rare!

We've had a couple of the meetings and they went well. One member participated in an adaptive study and really learned a lot, so we thought we'd give it a try. A few of us have been listening to Chris R. and really got motivated to use the time in meetings more effectively in regards to The Big Book. A lot of war-stories and not as much living in the solution.

I like to think we are doing our small part in using the text as a means for recovery and not just a place to gather and rehash all of the misery!

Thanks for your input! Rare, if you'd pm me with the information you almost referenced, that would be great.
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Postby BigBookGirl » Mon Aug 06, 2007 9:31 pm

My home group is called "By The Book", and that is how we keep it. Each day of the week, we either read from and discuss a portion of the first 164 pages of the Big Book and or the 12 & 12, or a member brings a topic that comes from either of the two. Whichever day it happens to be, the discussion is kept to personal experience with the 12 Steps! No drunkalogs and marriage therapy here!

Keep on listening to Chris R., Myers R., Cliff B., and the like! Go find the articles on the Primary Purpose website, lots of great stuff that will definitely get you "fired up"!!
~Remember it was agreed at the beginning we would go to any lengths for victory over alcohol.~ BB pg.76
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Postby Hullabaloo » Tue Aug 07, 2007 4:16 am

Thanks, BigBookGirl!

I love the name of your home group, it kind of sums it up, huh?
I will download Myers and Cliff. If they're half as passionate as Chris R, well worth the listen.
So tired of the problems and living in the misery. The Book promises so much, it's frustrating when others refuse to use it as THE guidebook inside the rooms and out.


Here are the steps we took............
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Postby Jim 725 » Tue Aug 07, 2007 7:08 am

Has anyone ever wondered why GSO/AAWS doesn't publish a Big Book Study Guide?
Simply because one isn't necessary. There are no hidden messages or meanings in the Big Book. It has been shown to be readable and understandable by anyone who can read at the beginning seventh grade level.
Many self-styled "Big Book Authorities" have made a lot of money recording and selling their Big Book Study tapes to alcoholics who have been told that they can't understand what they read.
Several years ago I was contacted by a member who claimed 50+ years in AA and over 35 years studying the Big Book, He offered to sell, at a moderate price, his Big Book Study A tome of over 550 pages explainingwhat was written in less than 200 pages.
Since when has the illness of alcoholism come to include learning disability as one of its major symptoms?
Jim S.
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Postby BigBookGirl » Tue Aug 07, 2007 8:59 am

Jim 725 wrote:Has anyone ever wondered why GSO/AAWS doesn't publish a Big Book Study Guide?
Simply because one isn't necessary. There are no hidden messages or meanings in the Big Book. It has been shown to be readable and understandable by anyone who can read at the beginning seventh grade level.


You got that right! Very simple, but not easy, especially when we try to complicate the process! I am guilty of that at times......
~Remember it was agreed at the beginning we would go to any lengths for victory over alcohol.~ BB pg.76
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Postby BigBookGirl » Tue Aug 07, 2007 9:02 am

Jim 725 wrote: Several years ago I was contacted by a member who claimed 50+ years in AA and over 35 years studying the Big Book, He offered to sell, at a moderate price, his Big Book Study A tome of over 550 pages explainingwhat was written in less than 200 pages.
Since when has the illness of alcoholism come to include learning disability as one of its major symptoms?
Jim S.


oh yeah, one more thing:

Here are the steps we took, NOT here are the steps we studied. Whew! I don't like to study, I like to do.
~Remember it was agreed at the beginning we would go to any lengths for victory over alcohol.~ BB pg.76
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Postby Blue Moon » Tue Aug 07, 2007 10:16 am

The 12x12 would not be considered a study guide?

I do think the Big Book needs some element of translation into English because it's a historical document. There are definitely words and phrases that are simply old-fashioned in today's language, and it also assumes the alcoholic reader is a male American. "prosaic steel girder", "longshoreman", even the definitions of "God", "disease", "resentment" need clarification in today's language.

Maybe AAWS realise that most AA members can't even agree on what brand of coffee to buy, or even the definition of "alcoholism", let alone how a study guide could be worded. Such a document would never get out of committee. Maybe they rely on sponsors to do the translation.

However, the plain fact is that most alcoholics will die drunk before seriously sitting down and "studying" a book and taking Steps unless the process is spelt out to them by someone else. I think that applies whether or not there's another study guide.
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Postby BigBookGirl » Tue Aug 07, 2007 11:48 am

Blue Moon wrote: However, the plain fact is that most alcoholics will die drunk before seriously sitting down and "studying" a book and taking Steps unless the process is spelt out to them by someone else. I think that applies whether or not there's another study guide.


I can't agree with you more there. I personally don't believe a person has to do any work from the 12&12 while they are working thru their steps, I think it can be confusing (even though they do "explain" the steps a bit more) and a bit like "information overload". But I don't think it's necessary for a person going through the steps for their first time to have to be able to give an essay on them. Assuming that the person is desperate enough and willing, a good sponsor and the Big Book should be sufficient to get them thru the steps as quickly as possible. (before the passion fizzles out)

As far as "studying" the literature, for me, it's more of a "more will be revealed" thing, if that makes sense. I worked the steps honestly and thoroughly, and by reading and applying my experiences to what is contained in the 12&12, I only get a broader understanding of what alcoholism is and what recovery means.
~Remember it was agreed at the beginning we would go to any lengths for victory over alcohol.~ BB pg.76
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Postby Jim 725 » Wed Aug 08, 2007 4:16 am

The 12x12 would not be considered a study guide?

Actually, no, although in typical alcoholic fashion we can, and do, call anything a study guide.
I suggest you write to GSO asking for a "Big Book study Guide." You will most likely get a letter explaining why they don't publish one--you definitely won't get a 12 & 12. (or a "12x12")
Jim S.
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Postby Brad N. » Wed Aug 08, 2007 7:16 pm

Blue Moon wrote:
I do think the Big Book needs some element of translation into English because it's a historical document. There are definitely words and phrases that are simply old-fashioned in today's language, and it also assumes the alcoholic reader is a male American. "prosaic steel girder", "longshoreman", even the definitions of "God", "disease", "resentment" need clarification in today's language.



This is the reason why I invested ten bucks in a 1936 dictionary. Its amazing what some of the words mean,such as "laurels".

Its equally amazing what some words mean that I think I know the meaning of. Words like grace,resentment and spirituality take on a whole new light when understood thru a 1936 dictionary.

The dictionary was well worth the investment.:)
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Re: Adaptive Big Book Study

Postby Brad N. » Wed Aug 08, 2007 7:26 pm

Hullabaloo wrote:Hey Guys,
My home group is starting a Big Book Study, in addition to our Step Study. One of our members used to attend an "Adaptive" study whereby someone would choose a topic, each person would find different passages from the Big Book pertaining to this topic, then read and reflect on it.
Does anyone have experience with this type meeting? Perhaps access to a syllabus that might be helpful?
Any and all information and comments welcome.
Thanks for letting me share,
Deck


That sounds like our Sat nite meeting. At teh meeting we dig around using a BB concordance and the old dictioary I mentioned in the previous post to investigate the topic as it pertains to each member.

Unfortunatly,the concordances we like to use are out of print,but if you Google for Little Big Book Dictionary,you will find a sufficient substitute.:)

http://www.Spammer/
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Postby Jim 725 » Fri Aug 10, 2007 3:58 pm

"prosaic steel girder", "longshoreman", even the definitions of "God", "disease", "resentment" need clarification in today's language

Perhaps you'd be kind enough to point out how the definitions of these words has changed since the Big Book was written? I've just looked them up in the "American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language" on the Yahoo education web site, and found them to mean exactly what they meant when Bill wrote them 79 years ago.
The only thing I have seen change in the 36 years I've been in AA is the newer alcoholic's willingness to go to any lengths. Rather than actually sit down and read the Big Book, they want someone else, a "sponsor," to do the work for them.
Since 1939 alcoholics worldwide have been getting and staying sober without study guides or tutors.
Jim S.
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