Speaking my truth about God... read with caution

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Re: Speaking my truth about God... read with caution

Postby kaosxtech » Sun Feb 25, 2018 5:56 pm

I find a really cool source of discovering your higher power is to google "test on what religion am i" The test asks a bunch of cool questions about like what would you do to a spider in your shower or how do you think the universe was created? After answering a bunch of questions it gives you an answer about what religion you might fit in to. At that point finding out about that religion might help "spiritual growth". I know what religion I am and I still have issues with every aspect of it. The religion is a broad stroke to paint with. After that its important to use your personal experiences and if your lucky enough to have them your spiritual awaking moments (like white light ones not educational variety ones) to develop that higher power of your own understanding. Its ok to not understand everything about your higher power. Its progress not perfection. I think your in the right place to continue having a spiritual experience of the educational variety. Good luck on your journey.
Selfishness—self-centeredness! That, we think, is the root of our troubles. (Alcoholics Anonymous, page 62)
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Re: Speaking my truth about God... read with caution

Postby Tosh » Mon Feb 26, 2018 1:48 am

kaosxtech wrote:I know what religion I am and I still have issues with every aspect of it. The religion is a broad stroke to paint with. After that its important to use your personal experiences and if your lucky enough to have them your spiritual awaking moments (like white light ones not educational variety ones) to develop that higher power of your own understanding.


Do you rate experiences like Bill's 'white light experience'?

I spent some time investigating Buddhism; I even did a two year course on Buddhist thought; which was interesting, but I'm definitely not a Buddhist. However one of the things I learnt was that the sect I studied did not rate 'spiritual experiences' as being anything much. If you went to your meditation teacher (for example) and told him/her about some mystical experience you had while meditating, you'd get a pat on the head, and told to just carry on with your practice. No emphasis is given to stuff like 'white light experiences' or any other mystical happening.

As for Bill's white light experience, what did it do for him? Two months after it he's stood in a hotel lobby and he's itching for a drink.

What saved Bill was that he went looking for another drunk and he 'dropped the nickel' and met up with Dr Bob.

Again, the emphasis seems to be on action.
Come, come, whoever you are. Wanderer, worshiper, lover of leaving. It doesn't matter. Ours is not a caravan of despair. Come, even if you have broken your vows a thousand times. Come, yet again, come, come.” Rumi (No sniggering from the sex addicts)
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Re: Speaking my truth about God... read with caution

Postby kaosxtech » Mon Feb 26, 2018 2:35 am

Tosh wrote:Do you rate experiences like Bill's 'white light experience'?


I am not sure I understand the question; however, if you mean do I rate a value for each person spiritual experience then my answer is no. I understand there are many genuine spiritual experiences and they almost all vary.

Tosh wrote:As for Bill's white light experience, what did it do for him? Two months after it he's stood in a hotel lobby and he's itching for a drink.


When I look at my spiritual experience. I feel blessed to not have had a white light experience because that feeling of enlightenment might not be enough to sustain me. I might find myself thinking maybe I can try controlled drinking. I love working with others. What I am working on daily is trying to make sure I am doing my higher powers will not mine. It involves me praying and going to a building and book that teaches me more what my higher power is about.
I appreciate the reminder about "Action".
Selfishness—self-centeredness! That, we think, is the root of our troubles. (Alcoholics Anonymous, page 62)
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Re: Speaking my truth about God... read with caution

Postby Blue Moon » Mon Feb 26, 2018 10:09 pm

Tosh wrote:As for Bill's white light experience, what did it do for him? Two months after it he's stood in a hotel lobby and he's itching for a drink.

Most of us who've had a sudden experience don't really feel the need to explain it to those who didn't. Either you've had one and therefore don't need it described, or you haven't and therefore perhaps wouldn't be able to relate.

The difference with Bill was that he was trying to figure out how to give that experience to another. The original equivalent of Step 12 was "having had a spiritual experience as the result.of ..."

The experience itself does not induce instant recovery from anything. It simply grants he ability to get onto your feet. If a crippled man has such an experience and suddenly realises he can get up and walk, he still needs to get up.and walk. He still needs to work on regaining lost muscle so he can continue walking.

Likewise for an alcoholic with such an experience. We get a breakthrough, but must still walk the treadmill of spiritual fitness.
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Re: Speaking my truth about God... read with caution

Postby Tosh » Tue Feb 27, 2018 12:12 pm

Blue Moon wrote:
Tosh wrote:As for Bill's white light experience, what did it do for him? Two months after it he's stood in a hotel lobby and he's itching for a drink.

Most of us who've had a sudden experience don't really feel the need to explain it to those who didn't. Either you've had one and therefore don't need it described, or you haven't and therefore perhaps wouldn't be able to relate.

The difference with Bill was that he was trying to figure out how to give that experience to another. The original equivalent of Step 12 was "having had a spiritual experience as the result.of ..."

The experience itself does not induce instant recovery from anything. It simply grants he ability to get onto your feet. If a crippled man has such an experience and suddenly realises he can get up and walk, he still needs to get up.and walk. He still needs to work on regaining lost muscle so he can continue walking.

Likewise for an alcoholic with such an experience. We get a breakthrough, but must still walk the treadmill of spiritual fitness.


I sponsored a guy who had a spiritual experience of the woo woo variety.

He drank again; almost immediately; in the warped belief that he thought he was cured of his alcoholism and could drink like a normal drinker (he couldn't). I kid you not. He's a psychotherapist who was studying for his masters degree. He's not a bloke to make up flights of fancy; so I believe what he told me.

Once he got serious about the program, doing the actions, he hasn't since.
Come, come, whoever you are. Wanderer, worshiper, lover of leaving. It doesn't matter. Ours is not a caravan of despair. Come, even if you have broken your vows a thousand times. Come, yet again, come, come.” Rumi (No sniggering from the sex addicts)
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