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YPAA is not supportive, its not really AA

PostPosted: Sun Dec 31, 2017 2:09 pm
by Splicer_777
...and it can be anathema to sobriety.
I am speaking simply from my experience.
Over the past 4 years I've had several relapses and they have been spurred by complete alienation from YPAA meetings and events. Nothing kills faith than going to a place where you're supposed to find support, only to find a bunch of insane youngsters chanting, screaming, making bad jokes that disrespect the seriousness of this program, and acting extremely cliquey and unwelcoming.
They always blurt out jokes while reading how it works, which is incredibly distracting to the newcomer.
There is something wrong with my current generation (I am 31) and those a few years younger than me. It may have to do with social media. It may be that young people act far more selfish, showboating, and trendy in order to fit in or get laid or whatnot.

In order to protect my sobriety, I am staying away from anything YPAA from now on. Older people might be boring sometimes, and a little hard to relate to, but its nothing like the complete shutout and ostracized feeling I get every time I do anything YPAA-related.

Re: YPAA is not supportive, its not really AA

PostPosted: Sun Dec 31, 2017 3:03 pm
by Brock
Welcome here Splicer, thanks for an interesting post about YPAA.

I particularly like your reference to social media, as a possible cause of the attitude many young folks display these days. This thing especially face book, seems to me to be the greatest promoter of inflated egos, it’s little more than a platform for showing off what we have and who we are, and exactly opposite of the humility the AA program requires for success. I even blame it for the fact that so many newcomers to AA, are overly nervous at the prospect of speaking in front of a group, but give them a phone and they will text out what they want to say just fine, the natural art of conversation is being lost to electronic communication.

We do speak about YPAA to new members here who ask advise, but these are usually teenagers or in their early twenties, I think at 31 I would be looking for regular AA myself. But of course regular meetings also vary in how they are conducted, and for my money the best ones are those which host step or topic discussion, rather than open discussion, which too often is people complaining about what happened at work or home.

Please feel free to post on any topic.

Re: YPAA is not supportive, its not really AA

PostPosted: Sun Dec 31, 2017 4:04 pm
by D'oh
A Young Peoples Group, saved my life. It was the Group I felt the most comfortable in, and they started me on the Steps quickly. Including dragging me along on 12th Step work (as a by stander).

"I" was the reason I slipped. It wasn't anyone else. I got comfortable after many years, and forgot that this Life is a Gift.

"Complete Defeat"

Re: YPAA is not supportive, its not really AA

PostPosted: Mon Jan 01, 2018 3:33 pm
by PaigeB
I would encourage regular AA with a little YPPA on the side.

No harm in having fun - but taking one's eyes off this deadly & maddening disease is a big mistake.

Re: YPAA is not supportive, its not really AA

PostPosted: Mon Jan 01, 2018 3:36 pm
by tomsteve
a 31 year old going to YOUNG people AA. hmmmmmmm......

Re: YPAA is not supportive, its not really AA

PostPosted: Mon Jan 01, 2018 3:52 pm
by Blue Moon
At 31, you just crossed that threshold of "Club 18-30". Maybe there needs to be a "Club 30-50" or something, but meanwhile the challenge is to look beyond arbitrary age and see the experience. Some of the most childish newcomers I see in AA are well into their 50s or more, so age alone is really not an indicator of wisdom.

Splicer_777 wrote:Nothing kills faith than going to a place where you're supposed to find support, only to find a bunch of insane youngsters chanting, screaming, making bad jokes that disrespect the seriousness of this program, and acting extremely cliquey and unwelcoming.


IME this happens in some "regular" AA Groups / Meetings also. I wouldn't be surprised to find it more prevalent in YPAA. If new, I would rather hang around someone with experience of 20 years' sobriety to pass along, rather than feel like a roomful of "the blind leading the blind". IMO "real life" does not happen in any AA meeting, it happens out there in the real world ... where you live, where you work, where you interact socially with others (in a sober setting), where you go to pray if you're religious, etc.

Unless you're the one bringing sanity into the room, don't expect to find it among a group whereby the hallmark of membership is insanity. Some will have it, many won't.

Re: YPAA is not supportive, its not really AA

PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2018 3:39 am
by positrac
Maybe changing meetings that explore growth such as a closed meetings, Big Book Study and or some other official AA literature meetings and get to getting sober as you are 31 and not some young person 18. We didn't have YPAA back in my early sobriety and if we did I can assure you that people acting like ass-hats was not going to be tolerated. Times have changed and social media is all about exposure and the shock factor and well in 10 years those clowns acting all funny might not be alive and so I say stick with the winners and move on.

Re: YPAA is not supportive, its not really AA

PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2018 4:16 pm
by Db1105
I sobered up at the age of 17, Though we didn't have an official YPAA group in my area. There was one meeting mainly attended by younger people. It was just one of the meetings I attended during the week. My sponsor suggested I attend at least one Step Meeting and at least one Big Book meeting, and at least one Men's only meeting each week.