Can a geriatric teetotaler be a latent alcoholic?

Got an issue with someone or something? Want to whine a little? Here's the place to do it, or to get to know folks, or ask those questions that don't fit anywhere else.

Re: Can a geriatric teetotaler be a latent alcoholic?

Postby Blue Moon » Fri Mar 10, 2017 7:52 pm

emeraldg wrote:"Having people there who might not respect the stated AA principle – “Anonymity is the spiritual foundation of all our traditions...” and making a joke of our membership requirement - “The only requirement for AA membership is a desire to stop drinking...” is in my opinion a very valid reason to run for the door."

I remember a friend in the fellowship telling me this unbelievable story. One of her male colleagues (who didn't know she was in the program) was laughing about how him and his friends sometimes attend an AA meeting for their Friday night "guys night", even though they are not alcoholics, simply because they didn't feel like paying for coffee at Starbucks and often find the AA speaker's drunk stories to be hilarious and entertaining.


If it's an "open" AA meeting, they're welcome to attend.
Ian S
AKA Blue Moon
User avatar
Blue Moon
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3564
Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2002 2:01 am
Location: New Jersey

Re: Can a geriatric teetotaler be a latent alcoholic?

Postby Blue Moon » Fri Mar 10, 2017 8:15 pm

Noels wrote:... since your dear friend already associate with the mental part of being an alcoholic but never drank a drop in his life, he's gonna have to hit the pubs or bottle stores, buy a shaitload of booze, drink for weeks on end non-stop and crawl through the doors of AA just before his liver conx in.

No need to go to such lengths. The Big Book has a clear description for how to make such a determination: "Step over to the nearest barroom and try some controlled drinking. Try to drink and stop abruptly. Try it more than once. It will not take long for you to decide, if you are honest with yourself about it. It may be worth a bad case of jitters if you get a full knowledge of your condition." (Alcoholics Anonymous "More About Alcoholism", pp 31-32).

Non-alcoholics get drunk. I see it every year on New Years Eve, I call them "amateurs". But what an alcoholic cannot do is sustain controlled drinking (due to the "allergy" condition).

That way he'll prove to everyone at the meeting that he is indeed an alcoholic since it seems we are now also required to prove our alcoholism.


No, a person just shouldn't expect to relate to / identify with anyone else in the room if they never either drank or felt the "merciless obsession" that the alcoholics experienced.
Ian S
AKA Blue Moon
User avatar
Blue Moon
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3564
Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2002 2:01 am
Location: New Jersey

Re: Can a geriatric teetotaler be a latent alcoholic?

Postby Noels » Sat Mar 11, 2017 1:31 am

Good morning beautiful people :D A beautiful sunny Saturday here by us with the promise of countless promises, opportunities and blessings :D

Aah! understandable, relatable and informative shares. Thank you Emerald and Blue Moon :D

mwah xxx
There is only Love
Noels
Forums Old Timer
 
Posts: 1247
Joined: Tue Mar 01, 2016 6:14 am

Re: Can a geriatric teetotaler be a latent alcoholic?

Postby emeraldg » Sat Mar 11, 2017 4:42 am

Noels wrote:Good morning beautiful people :D A beautiful sunny Saturday here by us with the promise of countless promises, opportunities and blessings :D

Aah! understandable, relatable and informative shares. Thank you Emerald and Blue Moon :D

mwah xxx


Welcome, Noels. And thank you. Hearing experiences that greatly differ from my own gives me a more balanced and holistic approach sometimes, always a good thing for this drunk, regardless of my personal beliefs
emeraldg
Forums Enthusiast
 
Posts: 82
Joined: Mon Feb 01, 2016 10:09 am

Re: Can a geriatric teetotaler be a latent alcoholic?

Postby clouds » Sun Mar 12, 2017 10:35 am

I still can't quite grasp why anyone who is not alcoholic would want to spend much time at AA meetings. Much less get involved with alcoholics (drunk ones or sober ones). I wouldn't have done so myself except that I understood that they had a solution for stopping drinking and I needed them to tell me how they did it!
" Burn the idea into the consciousness of every man that he can get well regardless of anyone. The only condition is that he trust in God and clean house." page 98 A.A.
User avatar
clouds
Trusted Servant
 
Posts: 1063
Joined: Mon Mar 23, 2015 11:45 am
Location: España

Re: Can a geriatric teetotaler be a latent alcoholic?

Postby Blue Moon » Mon Mar 13, 2017 6:43 pm

clouds wrote:I still can't quite grasp why anyone who is not alcoholic would want to spend much time at AA meetings. Much less get involved with alcoholics (drunk ones or sober ones). I wouldn't have done so myself except that I understood that they had a solution for stopping drinking and I needed them to tell me how they did it!

Extraordinary, isn't it? Back in the founders' era, alcoholism was considered a moral issue and so the sufferers were treated with contempt. Today, it's trendy and sufferers get a pat on the back! When Tradition 3 was written, particularly the short-form, Bill simply had no idea.

We do sometimes get alanons at our "open" meetings, which can be cool to see.

"Celebration" meetings tend to get all sorts of people among family and friends. Sometimes I think twice about going if I don't want to hear too much self-congratulation, particularly when I have a notion about how "spiritual" the celebrants truly tend to be when the meetings aren't looking...
Ian S
AKA Blue Moon
User avatar
Blue Moon
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3564
Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2002 2:01 am
Location: New Jersey

Previous

Return to If It Doesn't Fit Anywhere Else

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests