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There is a Solution Meeting

Dec 19

 . Reading link:  http://www.e-aa.org/chat/eaa_chat_reading.php?ID=45


When a newcomer is present, Link to Step-1 Reading: click here


Taken from the 4th edition of the book Alcoholics Anonymous, copyrighted by AA World Services Inc. and used with permission.

Chapter 7 --- WORKING WITH OTHERS --- (continues)

Pages:  91 - 92

Raise your hand " !! " at anytime if you would like to share.


When your man is better, the doctor might suggest a visit from you. Though you have talked with the family, leave them out of the first discussion.  

Under these conditions your prospect will see he is under no pressure. 

He will feel he can deal with you without being nagged by his family. Call on him while he is still jittery. He may be more receptive when depressed.

See your man alone, if possible. At first engage in general conversation. After a while, turn the talk to some phase of drinking.  

Tell him enough about your drinking habits, symptoms, and experiences to encourage him to speak of himself. 

If he wishes to talk, let him do so. You will thus get a better idea of how you ought to proceed.  

If he is not communicative, give him a sketch of your drinking career up to the time you quit. But say nothing, for the moment, of how that was accomplished. 

If he is in a serious mood dwell on the troubles liquor has caused you, being careful not to moralize or lecture.  

If his mood is light, tell him humorous stories of your escapades. Get him to tell some of his.

When he sees you know all about the drinking game, commence to describe yourself as an alcoholic.

Tell him how baffled you were, how you finally learned that you were sick. Give him an account of the struggles you made to stop.  

Show him the mental twist which leads to the first drink of a spree. We suggest you do this as we have done it in the chapter on alcoholism. 

If he is alcoholic, he will understand you at once. He will match your mental inconsistencies with some of his own.

If you are satisfied that he is a real alcoholic, begin to dwell on the hopeless feature of the malady.  

Show him, from your own experience, how the queer mental condition surrounding that first drink prevents normal functioning of the will power.  

Don't, at this stage, refer to this book, unless he has seen it and wishes to discuss it. And be careful not to brand him as an alcoholic.  

Let him draw his own conclusion. If he sticks to the idea that he can still control his drinking, tell him that possibly he can - if he is not too alcoholic.  

But insist that if he is severely afflicted, there may be little chance he can recover by himself.


END of reading


update by TM for Dec 19

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